How Does HBOT work?

How Does HBOT work?

How does Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) work?

It is so easy to see how and why hyperbaric works that many will try to muddle the obvious to keep you confused or to keep you away from it.

Often it is easy to see their economic motivation for their deception. Sometimes it is not. Stop for a minute and think for yourself. It won’t hurt. It might even help.

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Think for a minute about the first time you or virtually anyone you know tried to lift anything really heavy. Think about how many times someone has tried to lift something and someone has to tell them to breathe.

It is almost a natural thing to briefly hold ones breath when they lift something abnormally heavy. When a person holds their breath while straining for a split second they have created a hyperbaric situation in their body.

For a split second the increased pressure in the lungs is used to force an additional amount of oxygen into the blood passing thru the lungs, and it probably helps for a very short time otherwise it would not be so normal a reaction to hold ones breath………….Doctors will argue that the benefit is not prolonged, nor substantial, but the hyperbaric condition in the lungs for that period is undeniable. It is a natural state to attempt to achieve.

By increasing pressure on a gas (any gas) the size of the molecule operates inversely to the pressure added. In short, double the pressure on the gas, and you compress the molecules to half their original size. IT IS THAT SIMPLE. Hyperbaric makes gas molecules smaller.

It is simple. When one doubles the atmospheric pressure on a body, then the oxygen cells are crushed to half their original size. Once they are reduced in size thru the physical action of crushing them with pressure, then they more easily fit thru semi-permeable membranes in the cells. It is really that simple.

Increased pressure in/around the lungs and body tend to force oxygen cells thru the cell walls in the blood creating a hyper-oxygenated condition in the blood and thus the body if the hyperbaric condition can be sustained.

Very simply with more oxygen (to a point) the body runs more efficiently, much like turbo-charging an engine. If anyone makes it more complicated than that look at them with suspicion. It is simple really.

If you have attempted your own research on hyperbaric oxygen I applaud you. If you have conducted much research without a practical approach, then you can easily be misled. Some practitioners and entities in competitive fields put out mis-information to prevent people from pursuing the answer.

Some clinics and equipment manufacturers seem to put out information that makes their approach/equipment look better than it does, and often make attempts to make others look bad. It is competition and often this creates deceptive presentations.

The confusion that is introduced by those outside of hyperbaric pursuits and the confusion introduced by those within the arena of hyperbaric are some of the reasons we set up visits at the farm (CLICK) so people can see multiples of approaches, types, styles of equipment and so they can make an accurate personal assessment at reasonable cost to them.

The action of hyperbaric oxygen seems simple. At regular atmospheric pressure the hemoglobin in the blood carries oxygen. There is no practical way to get the blood/body to carry any more oxygen at normal atmospheric pressure than it already does. Breathing oxygen at normal pressure does not do anything more than load the hemoglobin, which very likely is already loaded. (Oxygen therapy is often used for people who have reduced lung capacity so the residual “air” in their lungs contains enough oxygen to keep them going.)

To carry more oxygen at regular atmospheric pressure one can build up their hemoglobin, which might entail iron supplements or at the extreme end “blood doping” as some athletes do.

What is found that with increased hyperbaric pressure the oxygen molecules are reduced in size and are forced in to the plasma of the blood as well as the hemoglobin.

So under increased pressure (hyperbaric) the hemoglobin loads up with oxygen AND the plasma loads up with oxygen. Only with increased atmospheric (hyperbaric) pressure does this occur. Some estimates are that mild hyperbaric increases the oxygen level in the blood by 500%.

Imagine in any combustion situation that you increase the oxygen for combustion five fold! Everything tends to improve!

Increasing the level of oxygen in the cells (plasma) helps things to run more efficiently. In some ways it is like turbo-charging an engine. With more oxygen one gets greater “combustion” of fuels, a cleaner burn, and more horsepower. The cells seem to run cleaner and more efficiently.

The result being that it boosts production…………..It also inhibits the action/production of anaerobic pathogens (bacteria and fungus). Where this is rarely discussed, this is a major positive it would seem to the process.

In essence the oxygen produces a boost to the positive sides of the body functions, and strikes a blow to some of the pathogens or predators of the body. It is a two-fold whammy that can have amazing impact. (CLICK SEE STORY).

From this point one often gets in to commercialization of ideas, concepts, theories, and equipment. Many facilities will prescribe 40 treatments. There seems to be no absolute reason for this other than it is how things are done.

Treatments do tend to build on the recovery of the previous, but 40 does not seem to be a magic number. It is just the number everyone uses. Frequency of treatments is important, but I am not sold on 40 as anything special.

Many clinics will prescribe 5 treatments per week with the weekends off. This has likely very little to do with your treatment, but everything to do with their desire to have weekends off. Treated correctly your body does not need a “rest” within a normal series of treatments, and a ‘break’ from treatment may actually cause a setback particularly if you are treating an anaerobic pathogen. The pathogen does not stop growing on the weekend, so why should you stop killing it?

I have found that many clinics or equipment manufacturers often prescribe what they have. If they can take you to deep depths and greater pressures they will prescribe that. Often their belief that greater pressure is better is what governs clinics to purchase expensive equipment.

It appears in my opinion the only need to deep depth equipment is for treating divers with the bends, and treating medical as a side-line. Low pressure (mild hyperbaric chambers) are not of much use in diver recovery as a result, but they are wonderful for recouping the average accident or sickness victim.

I personally have been treated at low pressure and at high pressure. The result was not materially noticeable in either type/style of approach. What I did find as a major personal breakthrough was the employment of more TIME at pressure.

TIME at pressure is far more beneficial in my opinion than pressure. Get this straight, a little increase of pressure for a long period of time appears better than great pressure for short time.

Clinics with deep depth chambers have far too much invested to encourage you to stay for a long time. That plus the perceived fear/concern for oxygen toxicity or nitrogen narcosis may be at issue.

Those with low pressure chambers often seem to have a lower equipment investment, but depending on how they supply oxygen to the recipient their cost could be substantial. Again, as a commercial concern their motive is to get a person in and out within an hour or 90 minutes.

What I have found thru independent study is that in a highly oxygen saturated blood environment some portions of the body require as long as 45 minutes for the oxygen to begin saturating all areas of the body.

This means in a 60 minute session the recipient may be provided very little assistance (only 15 minutes because it took 45 minutes to reach saturation)…………….The key in my opinion is to employ mild to low hyperbaric for long(er) periods of time. Mild hyperbaric chambers are typically designed to not be able to reach or withstand the pressures required for any of the common hazards of deep depth hyperbaric.

Imagine what it would be like to boost oxygen content in the blood by 5 fold (500%) then remain in that environment for 2 or more hours? This allows the 45 minute saturation window to be greatly exceeded, and the breakthrough for the recipient is greatly multiplied………….

The way I look at it, it really takes 45 minutes in the chamber to just get started. You must get in a position for longer duration visits. TIME, not pressure, is important.

Think about this. If greater pressure forces oxygen cells thru the cell walls of the blood and in to the plasma, then does it really help to have greater pressure? It may not. Consider things on balance.

Two or more hours at mild hyperbaric (1+HBOT, to 1.5HBOT) may be worth far more than a limited session at higher pressures……………Note: The body tends to retain oxygen longer if it is saturated longer. The softer approach of mild hyperbaric gave huge results in my personal recovery far after I ceased the high pressure, commercial treatments…….I only wish I had known this earlier in my quest. I simply wanted a reasonable solution to my problems. Mild hyperbaric seems to be the key.

We have done some personal tests to see if there are ways to enhance the treatments. There are methods to increase circulation, correcting posture (during the session and after), and a number of simple, inexpensive techniques to enhance the session. Come to the farm and you will see some of these employed.

(CLICK FARM VISIT). You won’t get what we have anywhere else. We apply common sense to hyperbaric and make it simple.

Contact us today for a farm visit. Email is usually the best method to contact.

Have a wonderful day and keep searching for truth. Ask, seek, knock!

Our author receives all corporate mail at the following regular mail address:

Theodore L. (Ted) Whidden
www.TheBrainCan.com
Post Office Box 158
Chipley, Florida 32428
United States of America

 

Pressure and Penetration HBOT: (High pressure versus Low Pressure)

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